Science


Rocks and Minerals


General Learner Expectations
Students will:
3–5 Demonstrate knowledge of materials that comprise Earth’s crust, and demonstrate skill in classifying these materials.

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:
1. Compare samples of various kinds of rock, and identify similarities and differences. – Link 1 Link 2 Link 3

2. Given a description of the properties of a particular rock or mineral, identify a sample rock or mineral that matches those properties. Properties that
students should be able to describe and interpret include:
• colour
• lustre or “shininess”; e.g., shiny, dull, glassy, metallic, earthy
• texture; e.g., rough, smooth, uneven
• hardness, based on scratch tests with available materials
• presence of carbonates. Note that the presence of carbonates can be tested with vinegar or another mild acid
• crystal shape for minerals, or overall pattern of rocks

3. Describe and classify a group of rocks and minerals, based upon the above properties. Link 1

4. Recognize that rocks are composed of a variety of materials; and given a course-grained rock and magnifier, describe some of the component materials.

5. Recognize and describe the various components within a sample of soil; e.g., clay, sand, pebbles, decaying plants; and describe differences between two different soil samples. – Link 1

6. Describe ways in which rocks break down to become soil, and demonstrate one or more of these ways; e.g., by shaking a group of small, soft rocks in a jar of water; by striking rocks together.
Note: Safety goggles should be used. Link 1

7. Describe some common uses of rocks and minerals; and identify examples of those uses within the school, home or local community.

Here is a video that covers many of the above outcomes: Rocks and Minerals for Kids


Building with a Variety of Materials


General Learner Expectations
Students will:
3–6 Use, safely, a variety of tools, techniques and materials in construction activities.
3–7 Construct structures, using a variety of materials and designs, and compare the effectiveness of the various materials and designs for their intended purposes

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:
1. Using a variety of materials and techniques, design,  construct and test structures that are intended to:
• support objects
• span gaps
• serve as containers
• serve as models of particular living things, objects or  buildings. – Link 1

2. Select appropriate materials for use in construction  tasks, and explain the choice of materials. Students  should demonstrate familiarity with a variety of  materials, such as papers, woods, plastics, clay and metals.

3. Select tools that are suitable to particular tasks and  materials, and use them safely and effectively.

4. Understand and use a variety of methods to join or  fasten materials.

5. Identify the intended purpose and use of structures to be built, and explain how knowing the intended purpose and use helps guide decisions regarding materials and design.

6. Understand that simple designs are often as effective as more complex ones, as well as being easier and cheaper to build, and illustrate this understanding with a practical example.

7. Recognize the importance of good workmanship, and demonstrate growth toward good workmanship.

8. Maintain and store materials and tools safely and properly.

9. Apply skills of listening, speaking and cooperative decision making in working with other students on a construction project

Here is a website that has links from it to a variety of websites that cover the above outcomes: Mrs. Zazula’s Hideout


Testing Materials and Designs


General Learner Expectations
Students will:
3–8 Evaluate the suitability of different materials and designs for their use in a building task.

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:
1. Recognize that functional structures must be sufficiently strong and stable and that unstable or weak structures are often unsafe to use.

2. Compare and evaluate the strength and stability of different models or objects constructed.

3. Describe the distinctive properties of some common solids, such as wood, paper or plastic, that make them suitable for use as building materials.

4. Apply procedures to test the strength of construction materials, in particular, different stocks of papers, plastics or wood.

5. Apply procedures to test different designs.

6. Apply procedures to test the strength of different methods of joining.

7. Identify and apply methods for making a structure stronger and more stable; e.g., by adding or joining parts to form triangles.

Here is a website that has links from it to a variety of websites that cover the above outcomes: Mrs. Zazula’s Hideout


Hearing and Sound


General Learner Expectations
Students will:
3–9 Describe the nature of sound, and demonstrate methods for producing and controlling sound.

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:
1. Identify examples of vibration.

2. Recognize that sound is the result of vibration; and demonstrate that the larger the vibration, the louder the sound.

3. Recognize that there are ways of measuring the loudness of sounds and that loud sounds pose a danger to the ear. Link 1

4. Recognize that pitch is the result of differences in the rate of vibration, and predict how a change in the rate of vibration will affect a sound. Link 1

5. Demonstrate a variety of ways of producing sounds; e.g., by striking an empty glass, by blowing air into a bottle, by constructing and using a device that involves vibrating strings.

6. Use sound-producing devices that the student has constructed to demonstrate methods for controlling the loudness, pitch and quality of sound produced.

7. Identify examples that show that sound can travel through a variety of materials, including solids, liquids and air, and that sound travels in all directions

The following link addresses many of the above outcomes: Sound for Kids


Animal Life Cycles


General Learner Expectations
Students will:
3–10 Describe the appearances and life cycles of some common animals, and identify their adaptations to different environments.
3–11 Identify requirements for animal care.

Specific Learner Expectations
Students will:
1. Classify a variety of animals, based on observable characteristics; e.g., limbs, teeth, body covering, overall shape, backbone.

2. Observe and describe the growth and development of at least one living animal, as the animal develops from early to more advanced stages. The animal(s) should be from one or more of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects. Suggested examples include: gerbils, guppies, mealworms, tadpoles, worms, butterflies/moths. Additional examples from other animal groups might also be included: brine shrimp, isopods, spiders.

3. Predict the next stages in the growth and development of at least one animal from each of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects; and identify similarities and differences in their
developmental sequences.

4. Identify the food needs of at least one animal  from each of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects; and describe changes in how each animal obtains food through different stages of its life.

5. Demonstrate awareness that parental care is characteristic of some animals and not of others, and identify examples of different forms of parental care.

6. Demonstrate awareness that animals require different habitats in order to meet their basic needs of food, water, shelter and space.

7. Recognize adaptations of a young animal to its environment, and identify changes in its relationship to its environment as it goes through life; e.g., tadpoles are adapted for life in an aquatic environment; adult frogs show adaptations to both terrestrial and aquatic environments.

8. Identify examples of environmental conditions that may threaten animal survival, and identify examples of extinct animals.

9. Recognize that habitat preservation can help maintain animal populations, and identify ways that student actions can assist habitat preservation.

10. Demonstrate knowledge of the needs of animals studied, and demonstrate skills for their care

Here is a website that has links from it to a variety of websites that cover the above outcomes: Thriving in Three Website